Some Pros and Cons of Partial Pool Demolition – WA's leading swimming pool removal company

Some Pros and Cons of Partial Pool Demolition

Some people often opt for the ‘cheapest’ version of almost anything. May it be clothes, car, even a property. And as together with anything that can be purchased, there are pros and cons to these “lower-priced” options. Here are some of them when opting for a partial pool demolition (decommission-only) over a full demolition.

Pro: Cheaper price? Check.

Of course, let’s start with the obvious — the price point. A partial pool demolition is at least $4,000 cheaper than a full removal of a standard concrete pool. An average concrete pool full demolition starts at about $8,000 +GST up to $20,000 +GST.

Con: Possible Doubled-up Expense

You may have saved a couple more thousands in choosing a partial demolition but in the future, if you have to do subdivision or maybe you needed to sell the property and you were advised by your real estate agent to have it removed and filled before listing the property.

Either way, if you were to pay for the entire process of 1) unearthing the previous fill, 2) having it fully removed this time and 3) have it filled (again!), it’s going to cost more.

Pro: Getting your backyard back ASAP!

With partial demolition, you can get your backyard back . This, procedure only takes a day or two compared to a full demolition which may take 3 days to a week.

Con: No-no for Future builds

For decommissioned-only pools, especially with concrete pools, since the pool shell is still in-ground, no structure can be built on top of the old pool. Until the entire pool has been taken out and the site filled and compacted with a certification, can the location be used as a site for building.

Which one do you plan to have?

Lastly: Getting a permit

It is easy to acquire a demolition permit for a full concrete pool removal. The same cannot be said with the other. This is because not all councils allow a pool decommissioning procedure. Either way, it’s best to call your local council and ask if it’s something that they allow, or not.

We hope that this short list of pros and cons can help you decide with which process you’d like to have when getting rid of your pool.

Wilma Bercasio