Things to consider before building a swimming pool – WA's leading swimming pool removal company

Things to consider before building a swimming pool

A swimming pool definitely adds a certain “cool” factor to a property but before getting one, here are some things to consider.

Purpose

Just like with any other major renovation or build, you have your reason as to why you’d want to have a pool. It could be for laps, relaxing or recreation. It could also be for your kids, to enhance a view, etc.

Once you have a clear idea of what your plans are, be sure to use it enough to justify about $7,000 (fibreglass) and $35,000 (concrete) and up for just installing your pool.

Type of pool

Concrete and fibreglass are the most popular choices if you’re planning on building a swimming pool. Concrete (steel-reinforced) has long been viewed as the most durable, and the strongest for years. However, recently, advances in fibreglass technologies have increased the materials durability and strength — not to mention it’s cheaper compared to a concrete one.

Size and location of property

The size of your property will determine the size, design and shape of your pool. It is highly advisable to get in touch with your council first to check what the requirements are in positioning your pool near property boundaries as this is the case with urban sites.

By default, swimming pools are easier to build on a level property so if you live in a slopy area, building may be trickier.

In ground or above ground

Digging a hole for installing and removal of a pool is costly but having an in-ground pool gives off a certain ‘permanent’ feel to a property.

However, if you are renting and want to take your pool with you when you move, DIY models or above-ground pool ones may be the best option. There are many options with these types of pools: basic ones (with no filtration system) or larger ones (with filtration) and is enough for laps.

Costs

Installation: Fibreglass pools cost starts at about $7,000 for fibreglass pools and $35,000 for concrete ones. There are also additional installation expenses such as covers, decking , landscaping and fencing.

Maintenance: Some ongoing costs of filtration include, running and servicing pumps and filters. With regards to keeping the water clean, there’s the budget for chemicals, saltwater chlorinators, self-cleaning units and suction cleaners, etc.

Largest maintenance cost for pools is the lining. Some concrete ones will need to be acid-washed every three to five years and resurfaced every 10 to 15 years. Vinyl-lined pools are more prone to being puncture so they should be looked into and repaired in 5-10 years. Fibreglass pools are the easiest to maintain and mostly come with a 20+ year warranty.

Contractor

Word of mouth recommendations are often the best way to get the best contractor. If you’re coming up short on the recommendations, you can go to SPASA Australia and start your hunt for your professional pool and spa builders.

Wilma Bercasio